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Budget

4 Ways to Lower Your Expenses to Put the Difference Toward Debt


Today we have a guest post from the lovely Kristi Muse. Kristi blogs at Moderate Muse and is one of Cat’s coaching students. Take it away Kristi!

Chipping away at credit card debt can sometimes feel like you’re Sisyphus, condemned to an eternity of rolling a boulder up hill, only to watch it tumble down again. You make the minimum monthly credit card payment, only to watch the number stay the same month after month due to high interest rates.

Living paycheck to paycheck means that you don’t have the extra money to put towards debt. It might also be the reason you have the credit card debt to begin with. Your child gets sick, and you have to pay the doctor. Tree roots invade your plumbing, and you are left facing $3,000 on your credit card for tree removal service. Life happens and you have no savings to lean on. Now you are left pushing against the boulder of credit card debt and watching the interest rates roll you right back to where you started.

In order to pay down debt, you have to do one of two things: increase your income or decrease your spending. Let’s say, for argument’s sake, that you can’t increase your income at this time. You’re already working two jobs, and every last penny you earn pays the bills and puts food on the table. Don’t despair! Just get creative with cutting your expenses. Practice these four spending cuts, and you will be able to put upwards of $100 towards your credit card debt every month.

Stop Buying Paper Towels


Paper towels are expensive, stop buying them! Even if you already buy the cheapest ones, you can still save your family $25 a month by not using them. I made the switch to actual cloth towels and will never look back. Cloth works better than paper. One 4×4” washcloth does the work of half a roll of paper towels. Walmart carries packs of 18 cloths for under $5. I bought three packs and never run out. Just throw them in with your regular laundry. Even paying per load at a laundromat, paying $2.50 twice a month to wash your cloths, you will still save your family $20 a month to put towards your credit card debt. As an extra bonus, you will also be helping out the planet.

Stop Eating Away Your Income

Pack a (reusable) bagged lunch and make homemade dinners. It’s so tempting to buy lunch when you’re running late or to pick up drive through food on your way home from a long day at work. The hard truth is that those $3-$10 lunches and $20-$30 dinners add up quickly. Track your food spending for a month to see how much of your income is lost to frivolous food spending. My husband and I were shocked to realize that we had spent almost $200 on non-grocery store food items one month, $200 we should have put towards the credit card. Life gets busy. It’s ok to have the occasional take out meal. Just be careful that it doesn’t take its toll on your bank account.

Drive Less and Walk or Bike When You Can

In this country especially, it can be difficult to get around without a vehicle. Even though gas prices aren’t sky high like they were last spring, it’s still expensive to fill up the gas tank. It costs money to drive to work, the super market, the library, or the park. Start a carpool, consolidate your driving, and don’t run to the store every time you forget something. Walk or bike if possible. By driving less, you’ll be saving more, and you may have an extra $30-$40 per month to put towards debt.

Reduce Utility Costs by Increasing Home Efficiency

Utility bills account for a bulk of monthly spending. Replace your light bulbs with energy efficient CFL or LED ones. Replace your shower head with a low flow one instead. Caulk your windows to prevent air leaks, which waste the heating or cooling. Auto set the temperature in your home to be turned down while you’re away or sleeping. Simple changes like these will make your home more energy efficient and bring down utility costs. Look at your utility bills from the month before and after your implemented changes, and put the difference towards your credit card debt every month. An added bonus is that some changes qualify for tax deduction!

These four ways of lowering your monthly expenses are just the tip of the iceberg. There are millions of ways to eliminate or reduce spending. Ask yourself what is truly necessary to life and cut out what isn’t. Give these tips a try, and you may soon be on your way out of credit card debt.

How do you save money every month? Do you practice these or other money saving ideas?

Meet Kristi Muse. She is a freelance writer, blogger, police officer’s wife, and mom to two beautiful children. She loves homeschooling, organic gardening, sustainable living, and cooking from scratch. To hire Kristi as a freelance writer or to read more about how she lives a balanced life visit her website at Moderate Muse. You can also follow her on twitter @moderatemuse.

Like what you read? It’s your turn! We’ll pay you for your debt story.

Around here, we’re all about taking our debt and beating it down. Grrrrrrrr! We pay $5 for every awesome debt story we publish (whether you’re in debt, out of it, or barely living to tell the tale) so send yours our way to be considered: reddebtedstepchild[at]gmail[dot]com!
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Erin Thompson

Erin Thompson spent years managing her own blog about budgeting and debt. Because of that, she has great insights not only about managing spending and borrowing but also about running websites profitably. When she's not writing articles for us, she's traveling and looking for new types of wines to try.
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The content on Cashblog.com is for informational and educational purposes only. It is not financial advice and we are not certified financial advisors. Cashblog.com strives to keep its information accurate and up to date, but it may differ from actual numbers. We may have financial relationships with companies listed on our site. We may receive compensation for the placement of sponsored products or services. We work hard to write authentic and accurate articles.